Evidence and Value-Based Purchasing for Value Analysis. Part 2 of 4.

doctor two_1200.jpgWelcome back for part 2 of our 4-part series about the impact of evidence on value-based purchasing (VBP). We hope you found the first installment informative, and that you shared it with your fellow supply chain and value analysis professionals. Don’t forget, you can download our free eBook, Evidence: The 5th Domain of Value-Based Purchasing to read the content of this series in one complete package.

Need a refresher for part 1? Read it here.

Let’s move on to our next VBP domain: Efficiency and Cost Reduction.

Efficiency and Cost Reduction

The Efficiency and Cost Reduction domain is derived from Medicare spending per beneficiary. It is based on claims and includes payments for both Part A and Part B services that were provided 3 days prior to hospital admission through 30 days post hospital discharge.

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Supply chain and value analysis professionals play a large role in some health systems when it comes to health technology acquisition, utilization management, and product standardization. Depending on whether or not their hospitals participate in bundled payment programs, they may also have a “seat at the table” with clinical committees as this relates to determinations for post-discharge care and the use of health technologies such as durable medical equipment (DME).

“Incorporating evidence about the impact of health technologies on efficiency and cost within the supply chain and value analysis workflows can directly lead to reductions in Medicare spending per beneficiary.”

Evidence Impact on Efficiency and Cost Reduction

medicare spend_1200.jpgIncorporating evidence about the impact of health technologies on efficiency and cost within the supply chain and value analysis workflows can directly lead to reductions in Medicare spending per beneficiary. Thorough evaluation of the body of peer-reviewed, published evidence can provide these professionals with the unbiased information they need to maximize efficiency and cost-effectiveness.

For example: Do you need a preoperative prep package that includes antimicrobial cloths, nasal antiseptics, and mouthwashes? Is this best practice or a waste of money? 

Although there is a recommendation (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection [2017]) that before surgery, patients should shower or bathe (full body) with soap (antimicrobial or non-antimicrobial) or an antiseptic agent on at least the night before the operative day, there is little or no evidence that nasal antiseptics or antimicrobial cloths prevent surgical site infection.

Also consider: Do you need to have antimicrobial central venous catheters (CVCs) as a standard item on all CVC trays? For which patients is there evidence for using an antimicrobial CVC?

Current professional and government guidelines for the prevention of central line−associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) recommend implementing quality improvement measures as first-line prevention, and reserving anti-infective central venous catheters (AICVCs) as a second-line measure for special populations at high risk, or if first-line measures fail to provide adequate protection. 

Part 3 of our series is up next. In the meantime, click the link below to download our new FREE eBook, Evidence: The 5th Domain of Value-Based Purchasing.

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