Get Engaged: Tips for Supply Chain to Improve Physician Buy-In: Part 1 of 4

Posted by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director on February 14, 2017

physician love_1200.jpgValentine’s Day is upon us once again. What better time to talk about engagements? While we don’t mean the kind that will send you walking down the aisle, we are talking about developing solid relationships with your physicians. In this evolving value-based purchasing (VBP) and evidence-based medicine (EBM) environment, getting buy-in from physicians on your technology acquisition, product standardization, and utilization management initiatives is crucial. Today we will provide you with some tips as part of a new series about how you as supply chain and value analysis professionals can use evidence to foster and/or improve your physician buy-in. These insider suggestions won’t require you to go on bended knee to effectively engage with your physicians and clinical leadership.

“Presentation of unbiased evidence can spark a respectful discussion with your physicians.”

Involve physicians in decisions that involve the quality of clinical care 

doctor decisions_1200.jpgWhen a physician requests a new health technology (diagnostic, device, drug, or procedure) that they’d like the hospital to acquire, make sure that as a supply chain professional you don’t claim to know as much, if not more, about the clinical applications of that product than your physicians. Acknowledge their expertise. In addition, your presentation of unbiased evidence can spark a respectful discussion with your physicians. While you likely have extensively examined the technology at hand, presenting evidence, not opinion, will prevent confrontational dialogue and lead to improved engagement for future initiatives.

Download our free eBook, 7 Ways for Supply Chain and Value Analysis to Fail at Physician Engagement.

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“Physicians are much more likely to buy in to changes when you lead with quality. There are multiple areas where evidence-based decision making leads to reduced costs and improved quality.”

Lead with evidence and quality, not price

There’s been much talk about achieving the triple aim (Improving the patient experience of care, including quality and satisfaction; improving the health of populations; and reducing the per capita cost of healthcare.). But when you get right down to it, it’s the cost that matters most, right? Wrong.

quality_1200.jpgProviding quality care that is cost conscious is the goal of most hospitals and health systems. Decisions made by physicians while providing care every day is probably the most significant factor in achieving these goals. Physicians are much more likely to buy in to changes when you lead with quality. There are multiple areas where evidence-based decision making leads to reduced costs and improved quality. Open your discussions with issues like clinical efficacy and safety backed by unbiased evidence, and you will have far greater success in engaging your physicians in your process.

Stay tuned

Hayes is committed to providing evidence-based support to supply chain and value analysis professionals to assist in your clinical decision making. Over the coming weeks, we’ll give you more recommendations as to how to effectively communicate with your physicians and clinical leadership. Keep your eye on our 4-part series. In the meantime, download our fun and informative eBook, 7 Ways for Supply Chain and Value Analysis to Fail at Physician Engagement.

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Topics: Hospitals, Hayes Blog, Healthcare Evidence

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